I know absolutely nothing about this recording. It’s a record that my grandpa made for himself, with just a handwritten label. As you may have guessed, it’s the stories of Jack and the Beanstalk and Rumpelstiltskin.

The stories are great fun. If anyone out there has any idea who the storyteller is, I’d love to know!

Updating my Bandcamp page

January 8, 2012

I’ve been doing some organizing over at my bandcamp page, where all my audio files are hosted.  I realized not long ago that it was already becoming pretty difficult to see what was there, so I’m in the process of organizing all my tracks into albums. Hopefully this will make it easier to browse around and find some interesting programs. So far I’m grouping together “like” programs–House of Squibb, American Melody Hour, Tony Martin, etc.–and grouping the remainder by year and whether it’s music or spoken.

I’ve also started adding album and track art to the programs. This past summer I spent some time at my parents’ house and was able to scan a portion of the huge collection of  work-related photographs that my grandpa had. I’m using those for the album art (unless I can quickly find an image online that better suits the album, like the Tony Martin picture). My plan is to add some notes to the album explaining what the picture is. I haven’t done this yet, but I will. I’ll still use pictures of the record labels for track artwork.

I hope you enjoy a little glimpse into my grandpa’s life through those pictures! For now, I’ll leave you with this one which is a new favorite of mine.

Keith Kinney at work

Keith Kinney at work, late 1940s?

Tony Martin, 1946

January 8, 2012

My grandpa apparently went on a Tony Martin kick for a while:  he has 14 sides of The Tony Martin Show from June-October of 1946. Instead of having so many separate Tony Martin posts, I decided to do something a little different and made them into an album. The album includes 12 out of the 14 recordings; two were in such poor condition that I couldn’t play them.

From what I’ve gathered, Tony Martin had a 30-minute Saturday evening show sponsored by Bourjois, a maker of women’s cosmetics. The programs include some fun advertisements for things like Evening in Paris face powder. Albert Sacks and his orchestra accompany Tony and Georgia Gibbs (“the little girl with the big voice”), while James Wallington is the announcer. I have a couple of complete shows and one which I think is complete but I’m not certain of the date of one of the discs. All the rest are either part one or part two of a two-part program.

Rather than detail all the songs here, I’ve included them on the bandcamp site. If you want to see those details, click on the album title in the player below (instead of the play or download buttons) and you’ll be taken to my bandcamp page. There you can click on the individual tracks to see the song listings. Enjoy!

 

Organ Music, unknown date

December 22, 2011

Unless you’re a die-hard fan of old-time organ music (as my grandfather apparently was), you might want to skip this one. Unless you’re suffering from insomnia, in which case they may be invaluable. These are two sides of one record that my grandfather labeled “Organ.” I’ve listened through this enough to make sure there are no skips or anything, but I have not been able to make myself sit through the whole thing to get the order of songs and all that. The first side is a Columbia overnight broadcast of Dean Faussner and Anita Carroll (not sure of the spelling on either of those). The other side which he labeled “Rumba”  is obviously something that he put together himself.

I don’t know which of these songs are on which side, but here’s what my grandfather’s notes had: “Later Tonite,” “Stormy Weather,” “Poinciana,” “Stardust,” “Rumba Rumba,” “Memory Lane,” “Mr. Pollyanna,” “Love Old Sweet Song,” and “Cuddle Up a Little Closer.”

Mystery of the Week, 5-19-1947

December 22, 2011

Making up for lost time…

This is a track that I digitized a long time ago but never posted. I apologize for the poor audio quality; this was with my old computer which put a lot of digital noise into everything. But I’ve decided that it’s better to get material up here that isn’t perfect rather than sitting on it until I get the chance to fix it (which might never happen).

This is an incomplete program, part one of two. Proctor and Gamble, Makers of Ivory Soap present Hercule Poirot in “The Blonde Who Went Bye-Bye.” Harold Huber stars as Hercule Poirot.

American Melody Hour, 1947

December 22, 2011

I’m back! Other parts of my life have had to take priority over this past year, but I’m going to try to start putting some programs up here on a regular basis again.

To try to keep the music coming, I’m not going to be putting much research into these posts. Here’s what I have on this program, American Melody Hour (sponsored by Bayer Aspirin). It’s on the flip side of a record dated 5/21/1947, so I assume it’s from a date close to that. The singers are Bob Hannan and Evelyn MacGregor on  “Midnight Masquerade,” “Heartaches,” “I Want to Thank Your Folks,” “April Showers,” and “Time After Time.”  This is an incomplete program, part one of two.

When I first looked at this, I almost skipped it. Who would want to listen to an old farm report? But I decided to go ahead with it, and I’m so glad I did! I found a lot of the material here just fascinating.

Canfield Fair 1946
Canfield Fair, Mahoning County, Ohio, 1946

The report starts with a visit to the Canfield Fair in Mahoning County, Ohio, which was celebrating its 100th anniversary. The local reporter describes in detail the entries in a competition for the best home-made tractor (and interviews the 1st and 2nd place winners), which is really interesting. Another segment features a housewife extolling the the wonderful benefits of using DDT in the home (of course, if DDT doesn’t work there’s the amazing new product from the Navy–448, now known as Malathion). There’s also a feature on the history and hoped-for future of the Missouri mule.

There are other reports and features about farm cooperatives, news from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and more. All in all, a great snapshot of rural American life in the mid-1940s.

Images of the Canfield Fair found at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ohmahoni/photos/album3.htm

Canfield Fair 2
Canfield Fair, 1946

 

21_33_Country Journal

Two posts in one day… what is this world coming to?

Here’s Mal Hallett and his Orchestra, Read more and listen to the program…

Eileen Farrell, 9-17-43

February 5, 2011

Eileen Farrell was a soprano Read more and listen to the program…

I hope everyone out there had a great holiday! If you didn’t get a chance to listen to my last post, please do. I still don’t know who the artist is in that recording.

Here’s some music of the type my grandpa seemed to love: Read more and listen to the program…